An American Robin Feeds on Chokecherry Berries Along the Yellowstone River in Montana.

An American Robin Feeds on Chokecherry Berries Along the Yellowstone River in Montana.

Fearless and determined, the American Robin is an underestimated and overlooked creature capable of deterring predatory birds ten times its own size. Closely observe a Robin pair in your own backyard and you will gain wisdom and inspiration.

Robin with a chokecherry berry in its beak

An American Robin feeds on abundant Chokecherry Berries along the Yellowstone River, South of Billings, Montana. Canon 7D, 400mm f/5.6 L lens, ISO 640, 1/1600 second @ f/5.6.

Fearless and determined, the American Robin is an underestimated and overlooked creature capable of deterring predatory birds ten times its own size. Closely observe a Robin pair in your own backyard and you will gain wisdom and inspiration; the Robin is a devoted and methodical family guardian and a lesson in diligence and devotion.
The American Robin is not a strict predator and their diet includes both producers and consumers. In fact they eat more fruit than invertebrates. Most of us have observed a Robin tugging on worms in our backyards but have you ever seen a Robin eating berries? During warm weather their diet consists largely of worms, insects and arachnids; I have seen Robins consume grasshoppers, wolf spiders, moths, butterflies, beetles, salmonflies, and even honeybees. Robins have been observed eating small vertebrates such as frogs and lizards. During winter and colder weather, the Robin eats berries and fruit and as the image demonstrates, summer Robins will ingest berries though insects abound.
A member of the thrush family Turdidae, the Robin (Turdus migratorious) is part “wanderer” and migrator. Turdus is Latin for thrush and migratorious refers to its tendency to migrate and wander to food sources. Although most Robins do migrate south, many remain in northern climates surviving on berries as they wait for the spring mating season. Robins will “wander” in search of winter sustenance but remain regionally. In Yellowstone County, Montana, large flocks may be observed along the Yellowstone River for the duration of winter. Robins do not migrate in search of warmer temperatures as many other species do and as long as food is available, Robins can conquer even the coldest winters.

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